Social Media Strategy Case Studies Using the Customer Experience Lifecycle

In my last post, I presented the Customer Experience lifecycle as a framework for companies defining Social Media Strategy and Business Objectives.  This model shows you where consumers are looking for information to meet their needs.

By focusing Social Media efforts on where your customers are looking for information, you can better define your Social Media Strategy around helping customers solve their problems.

To illustrate how the Customer Experience lifecycle is important, the following are examples from the first 2 stages:  Realization and Awareness.  I’ll cover the next four in future posts.


The Customer Experience Lifecycle:

  1. Realization – Recognition of a problem or need
    1. Best Practice – FiLife Stacker Tool
    2. Learn From – Motrin Moms Commercial
  2. Awareness – Connection between need and your product
    1. Best Practice – Blendtec’s “Will It Blend?”
    2. Learn From – Target Rounders
  3. Evaluation – Consideration of you (and your competitors) product benefits and tradeoffs as a solution to the need
    1. Best Practice – Best Western’s On the Go With Amy
    2. Learn From – Skittles’ Interweb the Rainbow
  4. Transaction – Money is exchanged for product
    1. Best Practice – DellOutlet on Twitter
    2. Learn From – Belkin’s Fake Product Reviews
  5. Consumption – Product is used
    1. Best Practice – Lego’s User Communities
    2. Learn From – Kraft Digiorno Pizza – The Ditcher
  6. Service – Post-purchase support for your product
    1. Best Practice – Comcast’s Twitter Account – @ComcastCares
    2. Learn From – Any Company Not Using Twitter Search

Realization – Recognize a Problem

Best Practice – FiLife

Company to Learn From – Motrin

Awareness – Connect Product to Problem

Best Practice – BlendTec

Company to Learn From – Target

Other examples you can think of?

Posted on June 4, 2009 at 9:48 am by Ben Foster · Permalink
In: Facebook, Leadership and Management, Strategy

12 Responses

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  1. Written by Alain Breillatt
    on June 4, 2009 at 10:28 am
    Permalink

    You need to read the BYU Magazine article http://magazine.byu.edu/?act=view&a=2391 to truly understand how Will It Blend evolved.

    It totally worked for my wife – I got it for her as a gift after she expressed a serious desire – and when the new blender showed up – my 6 yr old asked, is that the blender from that guy who put an iPhone in a blender?

  2. Written by kevin
    on June 4, 2009 at 12:30 pm
    Permalink

    Ben your right on with your findings

  3. Written by benphoster
    on June 4, 2009 at 12:46 pm
    Permalink

    @Alain – That's hilarious about your 6 year old. Also, great thought on “Will it survive the abuse a blender takes?” I'd venture to say most blender purchases are need-based replacements for an old/broken one. I agree with you that it's a subconscious need, which are often the most important types of consumer needs.

  4. Written by Alain Breillatt
    on June 4, 2009 at 4:28 pm
    Permalink

    You need to read the BYU Magazine article http://magazine.byu.edu/?act=view&a=2391 to truly understand how Will It Blend evolved.

    It totally worked for my wife – I got it for her as a gift after she expressed a serious desire – and when the new blender showed up – my 6 yr old asked, is that the blender from that guy who put an iPhone in a blender?

    One other thing, there is a whole community of people who do nothing BUT talk about blenders. They are the GreenSmoothieGirl type of health advocates who focus on the benefits of fresh vegetables and fruits – all blended up for easy consumption. http://www.greensmoothiegirl.com/best-blender.html

    This is actually the community of social experts who provide additional “expert recommendations” on whether you should buy a blendtec or a vitamix. These experts often have coupons or additional merchandise that they offer if you buy through them as an affiliate. So Blendtec has taken it a step further by engaging with their power users and offering them an affiliate relationship for “closing the transaction” from their website – much like Amazon does for books.

    And the consumer problem is not just, will it blend (turn solids into fine mush with no chunks), but even moreso, will it survive the abuse a blender takes? After you go through 2-4 cheap $50 – $99 blenders whose motors gave up the ghost after only 1 year, you start to think, there must be something better – but how will I know it can really survive? Will it blend answers this question subconsciously.

  5. Written by kevin
    on June 4, 2009 at 6:30 pm
    Permalink

    Ben your right on with your findings

  6. Written by benphoster
    on June 4, 2009 at 6:46 pm
    Permalink

    @Alain – That's hilarious about your 6 year old. Also, great thought on “Will it survive the abuse a blender takes?” I'd venture to say most blender purchases are need-based replacements for an old/broken one. I agree with you that it's a subconscious need, which are often the most important types of consumer needs.

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