Social Media Strategy Case Studies Using the Customer Experience Lifecycle – Lego, Kraft Digiorno, and Comcast

Previously, I presented the Customer Experience lifecycle as a framework for companies defining Social Media Strategy and Business Objectives. This model shows you where consumers are looking for information to meet their needs.

By focusing Social Media efforts on where your customers are looking for information, you can better define your Social Media Strategy around helping customers solve their problems.

Here’s a quick reminder of the framework:


The Customer Experience Lifecycle:

  1. Realization – Recognition of a problem or need
    1. Best Practice – FiLife Stacker Tool
    2. Learn From – Motrin Moms Commercial
  2. Awareness – Connection between need and your product
    1. Best Practice – Blendtec’s “Will It Blend?”
    2. Learn From – Target Rounders
  3. Evaluation – Consideration of you (and your competitors) product benefits and tradeoffs as a solution to the need
    1. Best Practice – Best Western’s On the Go With Amy
    2. Learn From – Skittles’ Interweb the Rainbow
  4. Transaction – Money is exchanged for product
    1. Best Practice – DellOutlet on Twitter
    2. Learn From – Belkin’s Fake Product Reviews
  5. Consumption – Product is used
    1. Best Practice – Lego’s User Communities
    2. Learn From – Kraft Digiorno Pizza – The Ditcher
  6. Service – Post-purchase support for your product
    1. Best Practice – Comcast’s Twitter Account – @ComcastCares
    2. Learn From – Any Company Not Using Twitter Search

Consumption – Product is Used

Best Practice – Lego’s User Communities

Company to Learn From – Kraft DiGiorno Pizza – The Ditcher

Service – Post-Purchase Support

Best Practice – ComcastCares on Twitter

Company to Learn From – Any Company Not Listening to Twitter

What other examples come to mind?


Posted by Ben Foster

http://www.thedeets.com/2007/11/29/targets-undercover-facebook-operation/
Posted on June 16, 2009 at 1:01 am by Ben Foster · Permalink
In: Strategy, Twitter

10 Responses

Subscribe to comments via RSS

  1. Written by David Title
    on June 16, 2009 at 9:40 am
    Permalink

    Thanks for the mention of my post questioning Kraft's “deceiving” campaign.

  2. Written by benphoster
    on June 16, 2009 at 10:20 am
    Permalink

    You're welcome, David. While searching for which efforts to include, many analysts mentioned this campaign as a success. I really thought you did a great job of avoiding the “Social Media Hype” and offering a valid critique.

  3. […] Consumption – Product is used […]

  4. […] Consumption – Product is used […]

  5. Written by Alain Breillatt
    on June 16, 2009 at 2:35 pm
    Permalink

    Ben, I think one of the better social media efforts that was really a groundbreaking approach back before Facebook and Twitter, was Microsoft's Channel 9 approach to reaching out to the community of developers. http://redcouch.typepad.com/weblog/2005/03/weve… Lenn Pryor was the idea man behind the effort but Robert Scoble became the face of it and it was a large part of what gave Scoble his larger visibility in the social media world. Microsoft actually did a similar effort in feeding the MyITforum community that built up around the System Management Server platform – a community I was intimately involved with back in 2003-2006. I have a post on this that I'm developing to discuss how to feed and build a community – and especially that the community, as Pryor mentions in the article I linked to, takes on a life of it's own. http://www.myitforum.com and the email mailing lists where the community thrived moved through two different corporate owners before it finally became free because Rod Trent had the wherewithal and the vision to make it an independent entity. But as he said to me back then, the community is made up of people – where they congregate and how they interact will never be controlled by the companies who sell the products that bring them together in seeking to assist each other or the company who owns the “sites” where they congregate.

  6. Written by benphoster
    on June 16, 2009 at 2:59 pm
    Permalink

    @Alain-Breillatt – Great example. Other then technical bias, why do you think it's so much easier to get developers involved in Social Media versus consumers? Is it that developers are just better trained at using the technologies and getting insights from them?

  7. Written by David Title
    on June 16, 2009 at 3:40 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for the mention of my post questioning Kraft's “deceiving” campaign.

  8. Written by benphoster
    on June 16, 2009 at 4:20 pm
    Permalink

    You're welcome, David. While searching for which efforts to include, many analysts mentioned this campaign as a success. I really thought you did a great job of avoiding the “Social Media Hype” and offering a valid critique.

  9. Written by Alain Breillatt
    on June 16, 2009 at 8:35 pm
    Permalink

    Ben, I think one of the better social media efforts that was really a groundbreaking approach back before Facebook and Twitter, was Microsoft's Channel 9 approach to reaching out to the community of developers. http://redcouch.typepad.com/weblog/2005/03/weve… Lenn Pryor was the idea man behind the effort but Robert Scoble became the face of it and it was a large part of what gave Scoble his larger visibility in the social media world. Microsoft actually did a similar effort in feeding the MyITforum community that built up around the System Management Server platform – a community I was intimately involved with back in 2003-2006. I have a post on this that I'm developing to discuss how to feed and build a community – and especially that the community, as Pryor mentions in the article I linked to, takes on a life of it's own. http://www.myitforum.com and the email mailing lists where the community thrived moved through two different corporate owners before it finally became free because Rod Trent had the wherewithal and the vision to make it an independent entity. But as he said to me back then, the community is made up of people – where they congregate and how they interact will never be controlled by the companies who sell the products that bring them together in seeking to assist each other or the company who owns the “sites” where they congregate.

  10. Written by benphoster
    on June 16, 2009 at 8:59 pm
    Permalink

    @Alain-Breillatt – Great example. Other then technical bias, why do you think it's so much easier to get developers involved in Social Media versus consumers? Is it that developers are just better trained at using the technologies and getting insights from them?

Subscribe to comments via RSS

Leave a Reply